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A Brief History About Collecting Coins from Pasadena Coin

  
  

Pasadena TX Coin Expert

Here's more information on coins from your Pasadena coin store. To the non-collectors, coin collecting can be seen as just a lame hobby to pass time; a way to feed on curiosity or wonder. The reality is that coin collecting is so much more than that.

A Brief History of the Use of Metal Coins

Back in the ancient times, the way to acquire something that is necessary for daily living was through bartering of other important goods or items. People would exchange their cattle, sheep skin or agricultural produce for land, other food or clothing. Later, with the growing knowledge and interest of people with metals like silver or gold, demand for these items led them to become the “currency” for acquiring goods. This new medium of trade became successful because of the convenience of exchange process that soon after, monetary values were assigned to these metals.

During the time of Abraham, “shekal” was the unit of value of both silver and gold. Although one cannot really say who, when and how the first coin was minted, it was still agreed in history that the first minted coin was released in the islands of Greece. Later, Persians and Romans followed suit.

In order to further differentiate the monetary values of the coins, they were minted in different ways showing different designs to represent their face value. Because coins now represent monetary value, their accumulation has become synonymous to personal wealth.

Reflections of Time with Their Stunning Art

Apart from the purpose of coins for trade, they have also become a means to “showcase” interesting milestones in human history with their stunning antique art. Even their minting “imperfections” show the development of the minting process over the years. Collecting them is enough to tell a story of the human struggles toward civilization. In the modern minting process, coin designs play an important role because they represent significant parts of history, a commemoration of not only political but also cultural developments for generations and generations of people to appreciate and honor.

In the United States, coin collection became popular in the 1930’s when the first series of commemorative coins were issued to the public.

Collecting as a Hobby

Is coin collecting only a means to kill time? The numismatics (or coin collectors) will strongly disagree. Passion and patience would probably be the key attitudes required in coin collecting.

The designs in a series of minted coins represent a chapter in history, the numismatics’ passion forces them to learn more about this, lest they fail in their “search” for the right coin to complete their collection.

Likewise, his patience allows him to creatively search far and wide for that coin he wants or needs. Pick up a coin from a numismatics collection and dare to tell a story. You will be amazed at just how much they know about history than the average Joe.

Investment

There is no doubt that coin collection has come a long way already -- becoming a billion dollar industry in the United States alone. Because the minting of coins has limits as mandated by law, their circulation also becomes limited, creating a “scarcity” in the process. Scarcity is what puts the “premium” or high value to these coins.

Start collecting coins today! Soon, you’ll be turning a wonderful hobby into something more profitable. Contact your Pasadena TX coin store for more coin information or Click Here to visit our online store.

Pasadena Coin Expert on Supplies You Need for Your Coin Collection

  
  

Houston Coin Expert 281-487-4653

Are you a budding coin collector, then look over these tips from your local Pasadena, TX coin store. If you’ve started collecting valuable coins lately out of hobby, it’s quite possible that you’re now seeing the potential of these coins as an investment. And you are right! Apart from the very interesting attributes of the coins you collect, giving you a glimpse of history, you are also holding on to a valuable treasure that in the future can be worth a fortune.

The key in coin collection is keeping them in pristine condition. When you have collected enough and now want to cash in on them, they will be graded individually. This means your coins will undergo physical and subjective test based on how well they were handled or the extent of their damage if there are any. The result of this grading will determine the trade value or resale value of your coin. In order to keep your coins in topmost condition, you need the basic supplies to display and store them properly. Here’s your list of supplies.

Small, foldable work table, soft cloth or pad

When working with your coins, it’s best to have a working table that is free from anything that may come into contact with the coin and directly alter its condition. A small, clean, foldable work table that you can store when not in use is ideal. This will also allow you to work whenever you please.  The cloth or pad is for providing protection to the coins for any accidental drop either on the table or on the floor. Without this pad or cloth on the table, a dropped coin may easily roll off and land on the floor.

 Lamp and magnifier

Your lamp may also be foldable or click type that fits well to your small table. Your lamp must have at least 75 watts of incandescent bulb in it. Go for the CFL type bulbs with “white” tone to save on wattage cost. The “yellow” or “warm white” tone will not be helpful in making important observations on your coins; they are soft thus hiding the coin’s blemishes or imperfections that you should be aware of.

For your magnifier, you may use any hand-help type that is at least 4 inches in diameter and with a magnification of 4x the coin’s size. A hands-free jeweler’s loupe with a magnification up to x15 is ideal in working with your coins for hours.

Gloves and surgical mask

The gloves will allow you to handle the coins without leaving any oily finger marks on them. The professional numismatics recommends using soft cotton gloves. If these are not available, you may use instead the powder-free latex or nitrile gloves that can be easily bought in local drugstores. Surgical masks on the other hand will prevent your saliva from landing on your coins.

Coin Holders

To safely store your coins, you will need coin holders. The most common coin holder is the standard 2” by 4” cardboard with holes in the middle on the left and right side of the board. On the wrong side of the board is a piece of polyester film that acts as window to view the coin when the board is closed up. The coin is placed on one side of the board onto the hole and the other side is folded over to close using a stapler.

Flat Clinch Stapler

You will need a stapler to close the cardboard coin holders. However, using a regular stapler will create staple bumps that may protrude and cause bumps to the plastic and coins underneath when you stack the coins together. A flat clinch stapler will press the staple flat when used. This will not create any bumps underneath the closed cardboard case.

Oh, before we go, remember National Coin Week is just around the corner.  See here for more informaiton http://www.money.org.  Be sure to have these supplies handy for your coin collection. You may ask your local Pasadena TX coin dealer about other things you might need for your budding collection.

Pasadena TX Coin Store Highlights First Spouse Gold Coins

  
  

Pasadena TX Coins

One Pasadena Coin Store points out, If you think that in making commemorative coins only the historical personalities are being honored, then think again – even the Nation’s First Spouses are celebrated, too.

In honor of the president’s wife, the United States Mint produces and issues proof and uncirculated half ounce gold coins series known as “The First Spouse Series” or “The First Ladies’ Gold Coins Series”. These coins feature the portrait of the first ladies and some important events on the obverse and reserve respectively. They are issued in combination with the Presidential Dollars that also honor the term of office of their husbands. For presidents that didn’t have a first lady, specially-designed coins have been assigned in place of the First Spouse coin.

More than just a piece of remembrance, these coins hope to highlight the lives and times of these distinguished women and their husbands in a general perspective. For each year of issuance, 4 first ladies will be honored and their corresponding coins released individually on a pre-approved date. The date of release is often announced by The United States Mint on the year of issue. With the exception of the year 2009 and 2013 release, there will be 5 coins released as two presidents for these representing years had two wives during their term of office. The issuance of The First Spouse Series will end in 2016.

First Issue

The issuance of First Spouse Series began in 2007 honoring Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson’s Liberty, and Dolley Madison in their order of respective release. The United States Mint issued a proof version and sold at the price of $429.50 and an uncirculated version and sold at $410.95.

These series immediately garnered intense demand from the public leading to a quick sell-out. In 2012, the series honored Suffragist Alice Paul, Caroline Harrison and Frances Cleveland for two nonconsecutive terms.

The First Spouse Gold Coin of 2013

Already on its seventh year, the series will honor five first ladies namely Ida McKinley, Edith Roosevelt, Helen Taft, Ellen Wilson and Edith Wilson in their order of release. Because President Woodrow Wilson had two wives during his term, five releases are expected for 2013. Likewise, for this series design studies selection is in progress and are being carefully reviewed by both the Commission of Fine Arts and Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.

Struck, mintage and tender value

The First Spouse Gold Coins, as authorized by The Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005, are struck in 24 karat of pure gold (.9999 pure gold), each weighing one-half ounce. They are considered a numismatic item thereby carrying a legal tender face value of $10.

Three years since the start of issuance of these coin series in 2007 (2007-2009) the United States Mint produced only a maximum of 40,000 for each coin design. However beginning 2009, several coins issued on this year had low mintages and towards 2010, prompting renewed interest and rise in value in the secondary market due to its scarcity.

The United States Mint also produces bronze medal duplicates of these series to the public for those who missed the gold series. However, these duplicates are not legal tender. Contact your Pasadena TX coin Expert for more coin information or check here http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/firstspouse/

Pasadena TX Coin Expert Spotlights Coin Grading

  
  

 Expert Coin Appraiser Pasadena TX

To determine the potential market value of a coin, your Pasadena Tx Coin Expert says it must be graded accordingly. The more accurate in the way it was graded, the better chances of it being sold at its appropriate price. In grading coins, several factors are taken into consideration:

  • how well the coin was preserved;
  • how well it was struck; and,
  • how much wear the coin received in circulation since it was minted. 

Coin grade is represented by an alphabetical code followed by a number that may be from 1 to 70, with 1 being in poorest condition and 70 being in perfect condition. 

Coin grading originated from Sheldon Grading Scale as far back as the past century; this grading system was adopted in 1970 by the American Numismatic Association. The Sheldon Grading Scale is still being used to this day by ANA and most US coin dealers. 

The coin grade scale 

Depending on the physical state of the coin (flaws and tone) and after it has undergone grading in the Sheldon scale it will be assigned a numeric value ranging from 1 to 70. There are key points on the scale where grades are already assigned to them. Some examples of these key points are: 

  • (P-1) Poor – this means the coin is almost un-identifiable, almost damaged
  • (F-12) Fine – very much worn but wear is even throughout coin; design elements still stand out
  • (MS-63) Mint State Acceptable – this coin is uncirculated but contact marks are recognizable; luster is dull but overall condition still appealing
  • (MS-70) Mint State Perfect – Considered the perfect coin without any visible flaws even with heavy magnification; strike is perfect, luster is visually appealing. 

MS70 vs. PR70: what’s the difference? 

The only difference between an MS70 and a PR70 coin grade is their representation. An MS grade is for coins minted for circulation, while a PR grade is for coins minted for collection. 

Remember that when coins are minted they are either for circulation (for use as legal tender) or for collection (uncirculated). It is possible that some coins minted for circulation were preserved well over the years that they appear to be “uncirculated”. In this case, they will have a high MS grade corresponding to their preserved quality and physical look. 

On the other hand, coins minted for collection, known as proof coins, are not considered legal tender. They are produced for the sole purpose of commemoration. Even as a collection piece, they hold great value because of how they were “struck – showing sharp details of the design over a very lustrous background. Also, some proof coins are made from at least 90% gold or silver. But even collectibles like these may suffer from wear due to mishandling (scratches or finger and other contact marks) and improper storage. Proof coins are graded depending on how they were “struck” in the minting process and the condition of the coin since the time it was issued to the market. If the proof coins are in top condition then it will receive a high PR grade.  For more information follow go to http://www.pcgs.com/ or consult our local Pasadena Coin Store for more assistance.

Pasadena TX Coin Store Highlights The 2013 US Mint Proof Set

  
  

 Pasadena Coin Expert

The United States Mint began its sales of the 2013 US Mint Proof Set last March 28, 2013. This set represents one of the most common annual offerings of the Mint, including 14 different coins in its proof version. 

What proof coin means

A proof coin is a coin that has undergone (struck) top-quality minting process. These coins are made to look “uncirculated” with their high quality surfaces giving mirror-like effect and very detailed frosted design. Although these contain the same base metals also used in their “circulated” counterparts, these proof coins are made and sold only for collectors and are not issued to be circulated. Likewise, the term “proof” only refers to the way the coin was struck and not representative of any coin grade.

Some Who & What About the US Mint?

The United States Mint is the sole manufacturer of the nation’s legal tender coinage. The US Mint was created by US Congress in 1792. Apart from manufacturing coins for legal tender used in trade and commerce, they also produce other numismatic products like uncirculated and commemorative coins, congressional gold medals, proof and silver and gold bullion coins. The public pays no tax in the operation of the US Mint’s numismatic programs as they are self-sustaining programs. The US Mint facility is based in San Francisco, thus the coins bear the “S” mint mark. 

Packaging and contents

The 2013 US Mint Proof Set is packaged in a newly designed outer box, displaying in front an image of Washington Monument. The back of the box displays images of the national parks, portraits of four presidents as well as images of remaining coins. The coins in the box are packaged in three plastic lenses together with a certificate of authenticity. 

In the 2013 US Mint Proof Set includes the following 14 coins struck in proof quality; all bearing the “S” mint mark. 10 of these 14 coins feature unique reverse design that is exclusive only this year. The 14 coins are the five 2013 America the Beautiful Quarters, the four 2013 Presidential $1 Coins and the 2013 Native American $1 Coin. 

  • 2013-S William McKinley Presidential $1 Coin
  • 2013-S Theodore Roosevelt Presidential $1 Coin
  • 2013-S William Howard Taft Presidential $1 Coin
  • 2013-S Woodrow Wilson Presidential $1 Coin
  • 2013-S Native American $1 Coin
  • 2013-S Kennedy Half Dollar
  • 2013-S White Mountain National Forest Quarter (New Hampshire)
  • 2013-S Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial Quarter (Ohio)
  • 2013-S Great Basin National Park Quarter (Nevada)
  • 2013-S Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine Quarter (Maryland)
  • 2013-S Mount Rushmore National Memorial Quarter (South Dakota)
  • 2013-S Roosevelt Dime
  • 2013-S Jefferson Nickel
  • 2013-S Lincoln Cent 

Pricing and production limits

The US Mint Proof Set is priced at $31.95. This price is the same as last year’s. Even with years of decline in sales of the annual proof, it is believed that there is renewed interest as reported in the early sell out of 794,002 units of 2012 US Mint Proof Sets. eBay auctions show 2012 Proof Sets to be selling at prices ranging from $80 - $100, triple than its original issue price. For this year, there is no implied production limits. Likewise, each household is encouraged to buy as many sets as they could.  Visit the use mint website www.usmint.gov

Contact your local Pasadena, TX coin store to learn more about coins.

Pasadena Coin Expert Reports on Early U.S. Gold Coins

  
  

As the National Coin Week approaches in less than a month, a Pasadena, Tx coin shop reports on early US Gold coins. These items are considered rare coins and they are definitely sound pieces of investment because of their value. Not only are they rare because of their age, they are also a showcase of the first few American crafters, engravers and mint masters. The mintages of these coins are rather low and the chance that they still in existence in all grades are slim, too. Thus they are hard to find and quite expensive. So, it is quite a thrill to explore the history of these coins when the US was a young and emerging country!

Pasadena TX coin shop

The first item featured is an item currently in our inventory and is pictured above. An 1844 $5.00 U.S. gold piece.  With only 6,361 minted, this is a rare item. 

Quarter Eagles (1796-1834) 

Quarter eagles come in 6 different styles. They are also popularly called as the two and a half dollar gold coins. They come in these types: 

• Draped bust, no stars 

• Draped bust with stars 

• Capped bust left 

• Capped head left (large size) 

• Capped head (small size) 

The large/ Heraldic Eagle Reverse and the Liberty Obverse have the same physical and manufacturing characteristics. They are 25mm in diameter and weighs about 165 grains of .916 fine gold, copper alloyed and struck in via a screw press using a reeded collar in the Philadelphia mint. 

Draped Bust No Stars (1796) 

This specific type of coin was designed by Robert Scot, chief engraver of the US Mint and struck in Philadelphia. The obverse shows the Liberty facing right and reverse is the US Heraldic Eagle Seal. There are 2 die varieties for that year with a mintage of just close to a thousand. There are just about 97 coins that are certified in all grades and only 17 of them are uncirculated. 

Draped Bust With Stars (1796-1807) 

This was designed by Robert Scot anywhere from 1796 to 1807. This type of coin comes in short mintages. There is no denomination on these coins. There are about 24 examples of these coins that were fashioned into expensive jewelries. 

1796 With Stars 

One of the special characteristics of these coins is that the letters that made the word Liberty are spaced differently compared to other US gold coins. There are also 8 stars on each side with 38 pieces certified examples made in all grades and only 12 of which are uncirculated. 1796 is the 4th rarest of early Quarter Eagle Coins. 

1797 with Stars 

These are 3 times more rare than the 1796 coins. There are 7 stars to the left and 6 to the right of the Liberty with a 16 star reverse. There are only 26 examples of certified mint coins in this year with a survival rate of only 5%. 

1802/1 

This type of coin only has a mintage of 3000. It is the 2nd most common type of coins of the early Draped Bust Quarter Eagle Coins. There are 8 stars to the left and 5 stars to the left of Liberty. 

1804 14 Stars 

This is the 3rd most common coin next to the 1802/1 coins and have the same characteristics. There are 100 certified examples and 19 of these coins that are uncirculated. 

1804 13 Stars 

This coin has no uncirculated examples that are known. It has 8 stars to the left and 5 to the right of Liberty. There are 5 certified in all grades with a survival rate of only 1%. An extremely rare coin. 

Do you have any of these rare coins in your coin collection?  Why not visit your trusted Houston coin dealers today, and see how much your coins are really worth!

Quarter Eagles (1796-1834)

Quarter eagles come in 6 different styles. They are also popularly called as the two and a half dollar gold coins. They come in these types:

• Draped bust, no stars

• Draped bust with stars

• Capped bust left

• Capped head left (large size)

• Capped head (small size)

The large/ Heraldic Eagle Reverse and the Liberty Obverse have the same physical and manufacturing characteristics. They are 25mm in diameter and weighs about 165 grains of .916 fine gold, copper alloyed and struck in via a screw press using a reeded collar in the Philadelphia mint.

Draped Bust No Stars (1796)

This specific type of coin was designed by Robert Scot, chief engraver of the US Mint and struck in Philadelphia. The obverse shows the Liberty facing right and reverse is the US Heraldic Eagle Seal. There are 2 die varieties for that year with a mintage of just close to a thousand. There are just about 97 coins that are certified in all grades and only 17 of them are uncirculated.

Draped Bust With Stars (1796-1807)

This was designed by Robert Scot anywhere from 1796 to 1807. This type of coin comes in short mintages. There is no denomination on these coins. There are about 24 examples of these coins that were fashioned into expensive jewelries.

1796 With Stars

One of the special characteristics of these coins is that the letters that made the word Liberty are spaced differently compared to other US gold coins. There are also 8 stars on each side with 38 pieces certified examples made in all grades and only 12 of which are uncirculated. 1796 is the 4th rarest of early Quarter Eagle Coins.

1797 with Stars

These are 3 times more rare than the 1796 coins. There are 7 stars to the left and 6 to the right of the Liberty with a 16 star reverse. There are only 26 examples of certified mint coins in this year with a survival rate of only 5%.

1802/1

This type of coin only has a mintage of 3000. It is the 2nd most common type of coins of the early Draped Bust Quarter Eagle Coins. There are 8 stars to the left and 5 stars to the left of Liberty.

1804 14 Stars

This is the 3rd most common coin next to the 1802/1 coins and have the same characteristics. There are 100 certified examples and 19 of these coins that are uncirculated.

1804 13 Stars

This coin has no uncirculated examples that are known. It has 8 stars to the left and 5 to the right of Liberty. There are 5 certified in all grades with a survival rate of only 1%. An extremely rare coin.

Do you have any of these rare coins in your coin collection?  Why not visit your trusted Pasadena, TX coin shop today, and see how much your coins are really worth!

Liberty Seated Dollar Coin By A Coin Buyer In Houston

  
  

Houston coin

A coin buyer in Houston asks an interesting question, have coin collectors ever wondered about the Liberty Seated Dollar Coin and the story behind this rare coin?

All coin collectors know that coin collecting is now a very popular hobby, not only because it’s quite thrilling to hunt for rare coins, but because they can also double as an investment. Rare coins have high value. An ordinary one dollar coin can be worth $150 or more when it is in its perfect condition. The value of the coin increases when it gets older and stays in mint condition.

One of the most sought after coin to collect is the Liberty Seated Dollar Coin. This coin dates way back in the year 1850. The Lady Liberty on this coin is uniquely designed because it is seated on a rock instead of being in a standing position, as what the ordinary coin has today. Because of its rarity, these can be worth thousands when sold or offered in an auction. If it is in good condition, then its worth more. This coin is no longer in circulation and there are only a few known series that exists nowadays.

Coin History

The Liberty Seated Dollar Coin was designed by Christian Gobrecht, who at that time was the chief engraver. The coin was created between 1840 to 1873 by the United States Mint. It was in fact the last one dollar coin that was struck right before the Coinage Act of 1873. This law temporarily halted the production of silver dollar coins and was barred for use in the US Market.

The coin has the obverse design similar to the Gobrecht dollar that was minted from 1836 to 1839. At the reverse was the heraldic eagle that was based on the design of John Reich, mint chief engraver of the first few coins that was circulated in 1807.

This rare coin was originally struck in Philadelphia Mint. Later on, the production was moved in the New Orleans Facility in 1846. The price of silver was very high during this decade with a value comparative to that of gold. There was an increase supply of gold and silver at that time because of the California gold rush. This resulted in the hoarding, melting, and exportation of silver coins. When the Coinage Act of 1853 passed, the weight a denomination of silver coin had was decreased. The Liberty Seated Dollar Coin was the last of the silver coins that was produced before this law was passed.

Collecting Liberty Seated Dollars Coin

Coin collectors are looking for mintmarks to check the authenticity of this rare coin. The mintmarks can also increase the price of the piece. For instance, the ‘cc’ markings are mint marks representing the initial of the place or the state where it was struck or produced. Those that are directly struck from Gobrecht are produced in very few quantities in the years 1836 to 1873.

These coins are extremely rare because although silver coins were produced at that time, because of the Coinage Act, no silver coins were allowed to be circulated. The rare design of the seated liberty was no longer found in the silver coins that were later on produced.

Are you interested to know more about this very rare and valuable coin? Visit your local coin stores in Houston today!

Houston Coins resized 600

Flowing Hair Dollar By A Coin Buyer In Houston

  
  

Pasadena Tx Coin Store

A coin buyer in Houston asks, what is the Flowing Hair Dollar? It’s not common to see a dollar coin since it has been the practice to produce a dollar in the form of paper bills. Despite all of that, there was a time when a one dollar coin was circulating in the United States of America. It was not fake money but a real and actual dollar coin. Would anybody believe that? Well, only history can tell the real story about the Flowing Hair Dollar.

The Flowing Hair Dollar was the very first of its kind to be officially used by the US Federal Government as a legal tender. The regular one dollar bill had been the norm, but not from 1794 to 1795. During those years, the dollar coin had been minted and used by people officially when they did financial transactions.

The minted dollar coin was similar to a Spanish dollar which circulated before in the U.S. and it was used as international currency. Probably the popularity of the Spanish dollar had inspired the US Federal Government to create its own version, thus the one-dollar coin was produced.

The US dollar coin was conceptualized in 1791 when the US Congress had created a resolution to standardize the minting of money. It was attributed to Alexander Hamilton because his study had inspired the Congress to push the national mint to create coins. It was also backed by President George Washington and so the US Government eventually passed the Coinage Act of 1792.

Although the Act was already passed, it took two years before the use of gold and silver coins came into fruition. It spawned the creation of the Flowing Hair Dollar and Robert Scot led the design team for the said coin. Scot, as the engraver, had actually made various designs before he arrived with the final look. Initially, it looked like a Liberty bust with an eagle shown on its opposite side. It was designed that way to meet the requirements of the Coinage Act.

Later on, Scot removed the Phrygian cap in the design of the Flowing Hair Dollar. He was also told by the government to include a wreath placed together with the eagle near the coin’s edge. Upon the arrival of the request from the United States Government, Scot had taken utmost care in creating the design. He knew it would be the most important coin in the US monetary system. Scot was helped by Frederick Geiger, who was the one responsible for engraving the words on the coin.

After testing the prototype designs or the first batch of the dollar coins, 15 stars were added to the coin to represent the original 15 states of the United States of America. Those were the states that were the founding members of the country and based upon the US Constitution. However, it was later phased-out and the Draped Bust dollar was used instead.

In the 21st century, one of the remaining pieces of the Flowing Hair Dollar was purchased for $7,800,000 which became a record-breaking value among the existing coins in the history.

Do you have a Flowing Hair Dollar in your coin collection? Call your local and trusted coin dealers in Houston TX today, get your coins appraised and learn more about other important and rare coins!


Coin Dealer in Houston and Rare Twenty-Cent Pieces

  
  

Coin Dealer Houston

Your friendly coin dealer in Houston can be a valuable source of information on rare coins, read on!  Before, money was used in the form of shells, gems, stones and many more when coinage was not yet invented. When coins came out, it slowly replaced the use of other objects as a proof of monetary exchange. 

Among those coins that were used worldwide are the twenty cents which is equivalent to 20% of a unit value of money. History had shown that the twenty cent coin was used only for a very short time spanning about three years between 1875 and 1878. The actual circulation of these coins occurred only in 1875 and 1876. Maybe it was short-lived because of its similarity to a quarter; thus, there was no overwhelming need for another coin when one that is almost the same is already in existence. 

There are also other short-lived coins under circulation in some years and they were marked with CC by the Cason City Mint located in Nevada. Those coins also came out in Philadelphia and San Francisco. The former did not have any mintmark while the latter made use of S as its mintmark. 

Because it was short-lived, any remaining pieces of these twenty-cent coins would be considered as vintage and would have a higher value. It was even estimated that less than 20 pieces of these coins still remain today. 

The twenty-cent coin was created by Senator John Percival Jones to increase the exports of silver from the United States. He also wanted to make use of the twenty-cent coins to match the popularity of silver franc as an international currency reserve in his time. The silver franc had survived until the present time despite the adoption of decimal denominations in European nations. Likewise, Europe also had twenty-cent coins like in the US, and Canada even followed suit. 

Various designs and patterns were eventually made for the US twenty-cent coins. A ship with day scenery design was placed on the coin. The ship also released smoke in the design while being blown by the wind. Various experts had debated regarding the direction of the smoke coming from the ship in the coin’s design. It was later verified by the experts in American Numismatic Association that the smoke design was dependent upon the alignment of the drawing and the dimensions. 

The final output of the coin design is similar to the one used in the quarter dollar and the dollar itself. That design was actually the Liberty Seated coin design in 1875. It was created by Christian Gobrecht. The coin had another design for its back and it made use of the Trade Dollar appearance made by William Barber. 

The twenty-cent coins in the US only existed for a very short time. Despite of that, the importance of their existence was shown by the fact that it was Senator John Percival Jones himself who pushed for their creation. Currently, only few of these coins remain in existence, and based on an auction that happened in 2009, their price can go up to as much as $460,000 apiece.

Want to learn more about these or various other rare coins, get in touch with your local coin club http://www.pasadenacoinclub.org/ and coin dealer in Houston today!

 

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